solar eclipse

Rajah Bose

This summer’s total solar eclipse in Oregon came with a price tag. The Oregon Military Department is requesting an extra $260,000 to pay for the costs of managing crowds during the August 21 event.

Joe Wolf / Flickr - tinyurl.com/z8o86qr

Oregon lawmakers are returning to the Capitol Monday for a three-day flurry of meetings. It’s the first round of “Legislative Days” since the 2017 session adjourned in July.

NASA/OIT Wilsonville

The solar eclipse is in the books, but the scientific analysis goes on. Teams of high school and college students scrambled Monday afternoon to locate and recover cameras and experimental payloads they launched to the edge of space during the eclipse.

Rajah Bose

Eclipse revelers whooped and hollered as the sun went black at a major encampment in the remote town of Durkee on the Burnt River Ranch in eastern Oregon.

As the sun slipped more and more behind the moon, the revelers whooped and screamed. A black shadow zoomed across the deep valley and people exclaimed as they took off their glasses.

Eclipse image by Rajah Bose

Whether in the path of totality or not, the solar eclipse brought a memorable experience to our reporters across the Northwest. They sent us their audio postcards from Olympia, Spokane and Prosser, Washington, and Portland and Durkee, Oregon.

Eclipse 2017: The View From The Northwest

Aug 21, 2017
NASA / Flickr - tinyurl.com/y9rzf9an

The eclipse is here.

Up to 1 millions visitors have flocked to Oregon to watch the first total solar eclipse viewable from the contiguous United States in 38 years. 

Rajah Bose

Hundreds of eclipse revelers from all over the nation have flocked to a remote ranch outside of Durkee in eastern Oregon. They’re camping in yurts, tents and RVs.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

The Washington State Department of Transportation will activate its emergency operations center on Monday morning in case solar eclipse traffic turns horrible. In Oregon, state and county emergency coordination centers were activated on Thursday.

Chris Lehman / Northwest News Network

Businesses across Oregon are reaping the benefits of the throngs of tourists descending on the state for the solar eclipse. But one tiny radio station in the path of totality will benefit from the eclipse in an unexpected way.

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

Miss out on eclipse glasses? If so, there’s still plenty of time for a homemade science project. 


All you need to make a pinhole projector is a cereal box, a pin, a pair of scissors, some aluminum foil, and a roll of tape.



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