Emily Schwing

Inland Northwest Correspondent

Emily Schwing comes to the Inland Northwest by way of Alaska, where she covered social and environmental issues with an Arctic spin as well as natural resource development, wildlife management and Alaska Native issues for nearly a decade. Her work has been heard on National Public Radio's programs like ''Morning Edition'' and ''All things Considered.'' She has also filed for Public Radio International’s ''The World,'' American Public Media's ''Marketplace,'' and various programs produced by the BBC and the CBC. She has also filed stories for Scientific American, Al Jazeera America and Arctic Deeply.

Emily got her start in radio as an intern at KUER-FM 90 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She also pursued internship opportunities at National Public Radio and Deutsche Welle Radio in Bonn, Germany. After graduating with a Geology degree from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, she went on to study Natural Resource Management at the graduate level at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

When she is not chasing down quirky news stories, you can find her off the beaten path skiing, biking or running in the backcountry with her long-time canine companion, Ghost. Emily also has 300 hours' worth of certified interdisciplinary training in Hatha Yoga from the Nosara Yoga Institute in Costa Rica.

Ways to Connect

Jaksmata / Wikimedia - tinyurl.com/nxtz7xz

The Trump administration announced this week it would levy up to 24 percent tariffs on Canadian softwood. It’s the latest chapter in an ongoing dispute between the two countries.

Ferry County Sheriff's Office / tinyurl.com/lgt93qn

The damage to roads in northeastern Washington caused by a deluge of water from snowmelt and heavy spring rain is significant enough to raise eyebrows at the federal level. 


Brittney Tatchell / Smithsonian Institution - tinyurl.com/j7q9g68

Genetic information from Kennewick Man shows the Bering Land Bridge may not have been the only route humans used to migrate to North America more than 10,000 years ago.





Martin Adams

Bedbugs have been wreaking havoc in the Northwest for more than 10,000 years. The oldest fossilized evidence of the parasitic insects has been discovered in a cave in southern Oregon.

Inciweb

Washington’s Department of natural resources responded to small wildfires in two of the state’s northernmost counties this week. But land managers don’t believe the blazes are harbingers of what’s to come just yet. 



The StyleHorse Collective/Coeur D'Alene tribe - youtu.be/-ITu9KaiIF4

In Indian Country, a gym membership isn’t a cultural norm. The incidence of heart disease and obesity are high there. So northern Idaho's Coeur D’Alene tribe is incorporating culture into its fitness programs.

It’s not Sweatin’ to the Oldies or High Intensity Interval Training. It’s powwow.

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

For the first time, Gonzaga University could bring the NCAA Division I men’s basketball championship trophy home to Spokane. The Bulldogs beat the South Carolina Gamecocks 77-73 in Phoenix Saturday in the semifinal round of the Final Four.

goducks.com

If the Gonzaga Bulldogs and the Oregon Ducks dominate at the Final Four on Saturday, the NCAA men's championship basketball trophy will come back to the Northwest.

"Anything can happen," said University of Oregon student reporter Jack Butler of the Oregon Daily Emerald. "And if you’re one of four teams you have a chance."

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

The traditional territory of the Sinixt tribe spans a wide swath of northeast Washington and southern British Columbia. But, you’ve probably never heard of them -- in part because Canada declared them extinct decades ago.

Kootenayvolcano / Wikimedia - tinyurl.com/ljl5rd5 CC BY-SA 3.0

A provincial court in British Columbia Monday could revive Canada’s recognition of an Indian tribe and vindicate a Washington man charged with illegal hunting.

Pages