Health and Medicine

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Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

The U.S. Surgeon General wants more Americans to carry the overdose reversal drug naloxone.

So how do you get it?

Senior Airman Jeff Parkinson / U.S. Air Force

The “Mobile Mouth”, a 42-foot long mobile dentist’s office, will stop in Portland and Spokane this week as part of a nationwide tour to provide free dental care to veterans. 

Enrique Perez de la Rosa / Northwest News Network

For the past 16 years, Jill Hutton has been managing a pediatric clinic in Aberdeen that once treated 70 to 100 children a day. But now it’s empty. She’s working on shutting it down.

“Everyone asks me what I’m going to do and I don’t know,” she said. “I won’t know ‘til I turn out the lights and lock the doors. I guess this is the last episode of ‘Cheers’.”

Dr. Heather Tick

At a medical clinic in Seattle, Dr. Heather Tick takes a thin acupuncture needle and inserts it into Hannah Lilly’s neck.

“How are you through there?” Dr Tick asks Lilly.

“Not great,” Lilly replies.

Jon Connell / Flickr - tinyurl.com/y72ktat6

The Washington state Senate has passed a measure that would expand health insurance plans to cover birth control, including abortion.

Kevin Mooney / Northwest News Network

The opioid crisis is front and center at the Washington Legislature this week. On Monday, lawmakers heard testimony on three bills aimed at preventing and treating opioid addiction and reducing overdose deaths.

Courtesy Shannie Jenkins

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee wants state lawmakers to declare the opioid epidemic a public health crisis.

On average, two people die each day in Washington from opioid overdoses. That includes deaths from prescription and synthetic opioids, as well as heroin.

Visitor7 / Wikimedia - tinyurl.com/j6o4lkn

Lawmakers in Washington state heard testimony Thursday on a bill aimed at improving long-term care for LGBTQ seniors. 


The bill would require that state nursing home workers and other long-term service providers be trained in the needs of LGBTQ patients. 


Visitor7 / Wikimedia - tinyurl.com/j6o4lkn

Nearly 20,000 people have been removed from Washington’s Medicaid rolls for ineligibility. The purge happened after the state stepped up efforts to verify residency and income levels.

Amanda Mills, USCDCP / Pixnio - tinyurl.com/y8stmzyt

Washington and Oregon are making contingency plans in case Congress doesn’t reauthorize the Children’s Health Insurance Program. CHIP is for low-income families that earn too much to qualify for Medicaid.

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