sinixt

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

What was expected to be a two-day hearing on tribal sovereignty spilled into its third day Friday. The provincial government in British Columbia is appealing a landmark decision that reestablished hunting rights for members of an Indian tribe who live on both sides of the border.

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

Members of the Sinixt Indian tribe reside on the reservation of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville in Washington. Last spring, one of them won a landmark court case in Canada reestablishing their tribal rights there.

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

British Columbia’s government has taken the next step in a long running legal dispute with an Indian tribe in Washington state.

The case dates back to 2009 when Washington resident and defendant Rick Desautel knowingly hunted elk illegally in British Columbia.

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

The traditional territory of the Sinixt tribe spans a wide swath of northeast Washington and southern British Columbia. But, you’ve probably never heard of them -- in part because Canada declared them extinct decades ago.

Kootenayvolcano / Wikimedia - tinyurl.com/ljl5rd5 CC BY-SA 3.0

A provincial court in British Columbia Monday could revive Canada’s recognition of an Indian tribe and vindicate a Washington man charged with illegal hunting.

Kootenayvolcano CC-BY-SA / Flickr

A case against a Washington state man in a British Columbia court that begins Monday could bring an extinct Canadian tribe back to life.