medical research

Craig McCulloch / Northwest News Network

Vancouver, B.C. -- A meeting of business and political leaders from Washington state and British Columbia has resulted in two agreements. One of those agreements hopes to speed up treatments for cancer. The other would create a border-straddling effort to boost innovation.

Thomas Lersch / Wikimedia

The National Institutes of Health Wednesday announced it will retire the great majority of chimpanzees used in federally-supported medical research.

The institute director says the use of our closest animal relative for invasive studies can no longer be justified in most cases. That means more than 300 chimps are headed into retirement. But neither of the two chimpanzee sanctuaries here in the Northwest say they're prepared to take new chimps.