Emily Schwing

Inland Northwest Correspondent

Emily Schwing comes to the Inland Northwest by way of Alaska, where she covered social and environmental issues with an Arctic spin as well as natural resource development, wildlife management and Alaska Native issues for nearly a decade. Her work has been heard on National Public Radio's programs like ''Morning Edition'' and ''All things Considered.'' She has also filed for Public Radio International’s ''The World,'' American Public Media's ''Marketplace,'' and various programs produced by the BBC and the CBC. She has also filed stories for Scientific American, Al Jazeera America and Arctic Deeply.

Emily got her start in radio as an intern at KUER-FM 90 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She also pursued internship opportunities at National Public Radio and Deutsche Welle Radio in Bonn, Germany. After graduating with a Geology degree from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, she went on to study Natural Resource Management at the graduate level at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

When she is not chasing down quirky news stories, you can find her off the beaten path skiing, biking or running in the backcountry with her long-time canine companion, Ghost. Emily also has 300 hours' worth of certified interdisciplinary training in Hatha Yoga from the Nosara Yoga Institute in Costa Rica.

Ways to Connect

Anna King / Northwest News Network

Four landowners near Moses Lake, Washington, have been fined $618,000 for illegal water use. The water was pumped from the Odessa aquifer, which has been in severe decline for more than 30 years. 




Northwest News Network/Austin Jenkins

An Amtrak train on its inaugural run on a new route from Seattle to Portland derailed Monday morning, sending 13 of the train’s 14 passenger cars and engines off an overpass, striking five cars and two trucks on Interstate 5.

The derailment happened in DuPont, about 40 miles south of Seattle near Joint Base Lewis-McChord, at 7:33 a.m. during morning rush hour.

Williamborg / Wikimedia - tinyurl.com/y9geafwv

Officials in the city of Spokane are hoping to take on campaign finance reform with a proposal meant to limit the influence of money in local politics.

Doug Smith / National Park Service

Conservation groups are offering a hefty reward for information leading to the poachers who killed two protected wolves in northeastern Washington state.

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation - tinyurl.com/ybza9ssv

The U.S. Department of State and the Canadian government announced Thursday that formal renegotiation of the Columbia River Treaty will begin in early 2018. Fish, electric rates and flood protection all figure to be part of the talks when updating the 53-year-old international treaty between the U.S. and Canada.


Idaho Legislature

Paulette Jordan, a Native American politician from North Idaho, will run for governor in the Gem State in 2018. Jordan, a Democrat, announced her candidacy at her 38th birthday party in Moscow, Idaho, on Thursday. 

Gary Wilson / USDA - tinyurl.com/yb562x5a

A group of eastern Washington tribes is joining a nationwide movement to reclaim indigenous identities and re-tell native stories. In this case, it’s all about a name change.

Tom Koerner / USFWS - tinyurl.com/h4cd7gw

Hunters will no longer be allowed to bring certain big game across state lines from Montana into Washington. That’s because of Chronic Wasting Disease, a deadly neurological disease that affects members of the deer family.

Bureau of Land Management / Flickr - tinyurl.com/y9glwuyq

Washington state’s Department of Fish and Game is offering its own version of retail therapy this Black Friday: skip the mall and go fishing instead.

Mark Darrach

There’s a new plant species in Washington state, but it hasn’t been named yet. And the botanist who discovered it will auction off that opportunity this week.




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