Emily Schwing

Inland Northwest Correspondent

Emily Schwing comes to the Inland Northwest by way of Alaska, where she covered social and environmental issues with an Arctic spin as well as natural resource development, wildlife management and Alaska Native issues for nearly a decade. Her work has been heard on National Public Radio's programs like ''Morning Edition'' and ''All things Considered.'' She has also filed for Public Radio International’s ''The World,'' American Public Media's ''Marketplace,'' and various programs produced by the BBC and the CBC. She has also filed stories for Scientific American, Al Jazeera America and Arctic Deeply.

Emily got her start in radio as an intern at KUER-FM 90 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She also pursued internship opportunities at National Public Radio and Deutsche Welle Radio in Bonn, Germany. After graduating with a Geology degree from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, she went on to study Natural Resource Management at the graduate level at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

When she is not chasing down quirky news stories, you can find her off the beaten path skiing, biking or running in the backcountry with her long-time canine companion, Ghost. Emily also has 300 hours' worth of certified interdisciplinary training in Hatha Yoga from the Nosara Yoga Institute in Costa Rica.

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On Saturday August 12, a woman was killed at the "Unite the Right Rally" in Charlottesville, Virginia where Confederate flags flew, racist and anti-Semitic insults were chanted and KKK robes were donned. After President Donald Trump's initial statement blamed "both sides," Republicans across the country were scrutinized for what they said, what they didn't and when. We collected some online statements of Northwest Republicans in the week after Charlottesville.

Inciweb

A heat wave broke and the air quality improved in the Northwest as a cold front moved across Oregon and Washington, but fire officials are still on high alert. They reported 24 new wildfires over the weekend.



Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

For decades, Smokey Bear has been the poster-mammal for keeping forests clean and safe from disaster, but there are other mascots who aim to serve up a lesson in environmental consciousness.

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers hosted her first town hall of the year Thursday night in Spokane. According to the Town Hall Project, which tracks these events across the nation, she’s the first Republican member of Congress from Washington or Oregon to hold a town hall event in 2017.

Inciweb





A state of emergency, excessive heat and an extended period of dry weather are unlikely to pair well with an influx of up to 1.5 million visitors in Oregon in two weeks.

Jim Peaco / National Park Service

Endangered species protections were lifted for grizzly bears in Yellowstone National Park Monday. Many tribes prepared for the delisting last fall by signing a treaty to protect the bears.

But one tribe in the Northwest looks at it differently. 




Northwest News Network

  Our staff checks in from around the Northwest with tales of hazy days and record-breaking heat.

Inciweb

British Columbia’s wildfire season has been deemed “unprecedented.” The province needs help from its neighbors to the south. But they may not be able to get it.




Brian Diehm / Pixabay - tinyurl.com/y9pnd4ba

Outdoor recreation generates more than $3 billion in state and local tax revenue in the Northwest. That’s according to a report out this week from the Outdoor Industry Association.




Alaska Airlines

Alaska Airlines is still ironing out operational wrinkles following the acquisition of Virgin America last year. At the same time, its smaller, regional airline is still grappling with a pilot shortage.

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