Emily Schwing

Inland Northwest Correspondent

Emily Schwing comes to the Inland Northwest by way of Alaska, where she covered social and environmental issues with an Arctic spin as well as natural resource development, wildlife management and Alaska Native issues for nearly a decade. Her work has been heard on National Public Radio's programs like ''Morning Edition'' and ''All things Considered.'' She has also filed for Public Radio International’s ''The World,'' American Public Media's ''Marketplace,'' and various programs produced by the BBC and the CBC. She has also filed stories for Scientific American, Al Jazeera America and Arctic Deeply.

Emily got her start in radio as an intern at KUER-FM 90 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She also pursued internship opportunities at National Public Radio and Deutsche Welle Radio in Bonn, Germany. After graduating with a Geology degree from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, she went on to study Natural Resource Management at the graduate level at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

When she is not chasing down quirky news stories, you can find her off the beaten path skiing, biking or running in the backcountry with her long-time canine companion, Ghost. Emily also has 300 hours' worth of certified interdisciplinary training in Hatha Yoga from the Nosara Yoga Institute in Costa Rica.

Ways to Connect

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

Reports of raids carried out by Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents in at least six U.S. states have people in eastern Washington on edge. But what started as a rally in support of immigrants and refugees Sunday afternoon, ended in a wild goose chase at Spokane’s bus station.

John Marzluff / University of Washington - tinyurl.com/hyoxkru

Urban development is encroaching on forests and impacting the love lives of some songbirds in the Pacific Northwest.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A bill in a committee of the Washington House of Representatives would exempt some personal information relating to the state’s wolf management efforts from public disclosure.

Supporters say it will keep those who work directly with wolves safe. Opponents are concerned about the loss of transparency.

U.S. House of Representatives

Washington's Republican Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers has weighed in on the Trump administration’s executive order that bans immigrants and refugees from entering the U.S..

Spokane City Council

Spokane’s City Council passed an emergency ordinance Monday night that prohibits religious registries of any kind in Washington’s second largest city.

Rp0211 / Wikimedia - tinyurl.com/gw2k2xf

With 22 straight wins and no losses, the Gonzaga University men’s basketball team are the only undefeated NCAA Division 1 basketball team in the nation. And now the Bulldogs have secured the top ranking in the country’s two major polls.

Inciweb/National Wildfire Coordinating Group

People who work for several federal agencies have scrambled in the early days of the Trump administration. They’re responding to orders that freeze hiring. Some orders to limit communication with the public have since been pulled back.

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

A small crowd gathered at Republican Headquarters in Spokane to see Donald Trump take the oath of office Friday morning. As Donald Trump placed his hand on the bible, 35 people stood, many clad in red white and blue, raised mimosas and cups of coffee to toast the 45th president.

CDC

Students will have to stay home from school in Spokane if they can’t prove immunity to mumps. The U.S is in the midst of the largest mumps outbreak in a decade, and it’s hit the Northwest.

Kent Miller / National Park Service - tinyurl.com/jk42yoh

Grizzly bears have been listed as threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act since 1975. In Washington, they are considered endangered. Last week, federal officials unveiled their draft plan to reintroduce grizzlies in North Central Washington.

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