Emily Schwing

Inland Northwest Correspondent

Emily Schwing comes to the Inland Northwest by way of Alaska, where she covered social and environmental issues with an Arctic spin as well as natural resource development, wildlife management and Alaska Native issues for nearly a decade. Her work has been heard on National Public Radio's programs like ''Morning Edition'' and ''All things Considered.'' She has also filed for Public Radio International’s ''The World,'' American Public Media's ''Marketplace,'' and various programs produced by the BBC and the CBC. She has also filed stories for Scientific American, Al Jazeera America and Arctic Deeply.

Emily got her start in radio as an intern at KUER-FM 90 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She also pursued internship opportunities at National Public Radio and Deutsche Welle Radio in Bonn, Germany. After graduating with a Geology degree from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, she went on to study Natural Resource Management at the graduate level at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

When she is not chasing down quirky news stories, you can find her off the beaten path skiing, biking or running in the backcountry with her long-time canine companion, Ghost. Emily also has 300 hours' worth of certified interdisciplinary training in Hatha Yoga from the Nosara Yoga Institute in Costa Rica.

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Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

The Gonzaga University men's basketball team will advance to the Elite Eight in the NCAA Division One Tournament for only the third time in the program's history. Top-seeded Gonzaga beat No. 4 West Virginia 61-58 Thursday night in a tense, defensive Sweet 16 round battle.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

The state of the salmon population in Idaho’s Snake River was the topic of a passionate discussion during a conference hosted by members of Idaho’s Nez Perce Indian tribe over the weekend.

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

Members of Idaho’s Nez Perce tribe are concerned about their treaty rights under a new president. That was the topic of the day at a conference that opened Friday in Lewiston, Idaho.

Harvey Barrison / Flickr - tinyurl.com/zhj7uae

A state Supreme court decision Thursday gives a Washington tribe the right to transport goods and services across state lines without taxation. Attorneys and tribal members said the case is a win on the side of tribal sovereignty.

Inciweb

Washington state and the U.S. Forest Service signed an agreement last week that officials say will improve on-the-ground management of public lands susceptible to wildfire.

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

Washington Public Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz said 2.7 million acres of state land is in poor health and some of that is at risk of catastrophic wildfire.

NRCS

The latest Washington state water supply forecast is out and managers said Monday there’s no reason to believe the state might face drought this year.

Melissa Webb / USDA-NRCS

Scientists have new cautionary predictions based on the low Northwest snowpack levels of the last two winters.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement

The Department of Homeland Security this week released further details on the Trump administration’s immigration policy. It calls on local law enforcement for assistance. But not all Northwest cities are willing to comply.

Doug Smith / National Park Service

Washington’s House Committee on Agriculture & Natural Resources hosted a public hearing Wednesday on a bill that proposes the partial delisting of wolves from the state’s endangered species list.

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