Emily Schwing

Inland Northwest Correspondent

Emily Schwing comes to the Inland Northwest by way of Alaska, where she covered social and environmental issues with an Arctic spin as well as natural resource development, wildlife management and Alaska Native issues for nearly a decade. Her work has been heard on National Public Radio's programs like ''Morning Edition'' and ''All things Considered.'' She has also filed for Public Radio International’s ''The World,'' American Public Media's ''Marketplace,'' and various programs produced by the BBC and the CBC. She has also filed stories for Scientific American, Al Jazeera America and Arctic Deeply.

Emily got her start in radio as an intern at KUER-FM 90 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She also pursued internship opportunities at National Public Radio and Deutsche Welle Radio in Bonn, Germany. After graduating with a Geology degree from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, she went on to study Natural Resource Management at the graduate level at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

When she is not chasing down quirky news stories, you can find her off the beaten path skiing, biking or running in the backcountry with her long-time canine companion, Ghost. Emily also has 300 hours' worth of certified interdisciplinary training in Hatha Yoga from the Nosara Yoga Institute in Costa Rica.

Ways to Connect

U.S. House of Representatives

According to multiple networks, President-elect Donald Trump is expected to nominate Washington’s six-term Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers for Secretary of the Interior. This could signal that federal conservation policies are set to take a hard right turn.

Tami Heilemann / U.S. Department of the Interior

The U.S. Department of the Interior will consult with tribes this winter on how best to modernize laws that regulate business in Indian Country. Interior made the announcement on the Swinomish reservation in Western Washington Thursday.

USDA APHIS Wildlife Services

Feral pigs are a problem in 39 U.S. states and the Northwest is not immune. That’s why officials from four Washington agencies issued a reminder to residents last week to be on the lookout.

Kimon Berlin / Flickr - tinyurl.com/gp8eygb

A federal civil trial in Seattle against Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway is on hold pending a tentative settlement in a case brought by seven environmental groups that has been in litigation since 2013.

Plaintiffs argued coal dust and pieces of coal the company ships from Wyoming’s Powder River Basin across the Northwest have been polluting Washington’s waterways for years in violation of the federal Clean Water Act.

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

Americans are taking in the outcome of a hard-fought battle for the White House and there’s no argument the race was fierce. That was also the case at an entirely different kind of contest in Spokane last weekend, where the only thing stiffer than the competition were the whiskers.

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

At the Trump victory party in Spokane Valley, Washington, Republicans said they were looking for a candidate who could bring jobs to eastern Washington and the rest of the nation, who had family values they can support, and who can protect America’s borders.

Raymond D. Woods Jr. / Flickr - tinyurl.com/oyg9znx

Seven environmental groups want to prove coal being hauled by rail is polluting Washington’s waterways. If they are successful, the outcome could have huge implications for the way trains are regulated going forward.

The case is scheduled to go to trial in Seattle Monday.

David Gubler / Wikimedia - tinyurl.com/z7atuch

An initiative proposed for next year’s ballot in Spokane, Washington, would restrict coal and oil transport through the city by train. But now a hearing examiner for the city of Spokane says the proposal cannot be enforced.

Malheur National Wildlife Refuge / Facebook http://on.fb.me/1mAvgpo

More than a quarter of the lands in Washington state and more than half of Oregon’s acreage are owned by the U.S. government. It’s land that makes up national parks, forests, monuments, and wildlife refuges.

So what would it mean if the federal government did what many have been asking for, and transferred those lands to states?

Harvey Barrison / Flickr - tinyurl.com/zhj7uae

State and federal law protect the rights of Native American children even when one of their parents is not Indian. That’s the word today from the Washington state Supreme Court.

Pages