Emily Schwing

Inland Northwest Correspondent

Emily Schwing comes to the Inland Northwest by way of Alaska, where she covered social and environmental issues with an Arctic spin as well as natural resource development, wildlife management and Alaska Native issues for nearly a decade. Her work has been heard on National Public Radio's programs like ''Morning Edition'' and ''All things Considered.'' She has also filed for Public Radio International’s ''The World,'' American Public Media's ''Marketplace,'' and various programs produced by the BBC and the CBC. She has also filed stories for Scientific American, Al Jazeera America and Arctic Deeply.

Emily got her start in radio as an intern at KUER-FM 90 in Salt Lake City, Utah. She also pursued internship opportunities at National Public Radio and Deutsche Welle Radio in Bonn, Germany. After graduating with a Geology degree from Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota, she went on to study Natural Resource Management at the graduate level at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks.

When she is not chasing down quirky news stories, you can find her off the beaten path skiing, biking or running in the backcountry with her long-time canine companion, Ghost. Emily also has 300 hours' worth of certified interdisciplinary training in Hatha Yoga from the Nosara Yoga Institute in Costa Rica.

Ways to Connect

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

Hundreds of people gathered on the front steps of the Oregon Capitol in Salem Tuesday to support increased funding for state services like education, health care and public safety.

OregonDOT / Flickr

The Oregon Senate sent a handful of education-related bills to the governor’s desk Tuesday morning. One of them allows parents to hold their children back from kindergarten for an extra year.

Cacophony / Wikimedia - tinyurl.com/h57fyfp

The Oregon Senate passed a bill Tuesday that will make graduation easier for students who are homeless, in foster care or come from military families. The bill passed unanimously and is on its way to Gov. Kate Brown.

D. Kopshever / National Park Service

Ranchers in northeastern Washington state can turn out their cattle to graze on the Colville National Forest June 1. Last year a statewide battle broke out over how best to manage wolves and cattle together.

In the end, half of one wolf pack was shot from a helicopter and some ranchers received death threats.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Wolves mostly make the news when they are in conflict with livestock and that’s part of the reason they were once removed from the Western landscape. But a new study shows wolves play an important role, whether we like it or not.

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has recalled 319,000 pounds of food processed at a prison in Airway Heights, Washington, near Spokane. That’s after water in that community was found to be contaminated with chemicals used at nearby Fairchild Air Force Base.




Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network





The Colville Tribe has convinced the Army Corps of Engineers to help keep a daily ferry crossing the Columbia River in northeast Washington state this spring.

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

Residents of Airway Heights, Washington, have been advised not to drink water from the tap. The advisory came Tuesday from nearby Fairchild Air Force Base, as part of the Pentagon’s program to test and clean water sources near military bases around the country.

Josh Anderson

The wettest spring on record in eastern Washington state not only rendered state highways and other roads impassable, it has also kept loggers from harvesting timber and shuttered one sawmill for at least two weeks.

Emily Schwing / Northwest News Network

Well over 100 people gathered Saturday to show support after vandals broke into the Salish School of Spokane and scrawled racial slurs targeting Native Americans on the walls of a classroom.

Children between the ages of one and 11 attend the school, where they learn Salish—a language spoken among many Indian tribes in the Northwest, including the Colville, Kalispell, and the Spokane tribes.

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