Environment and Planning

Environment and Planning

Washington Closure Hanford

Community leaders in southeast Washington are looking to develop parts of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation as a prime spot for tourists.

Anna King / Northwest News Network

A dried-out three-mile-stretch of creek in Central Washington will soon swell again with water. It’s part of a project near Ellensburg to pipe irrigation water from the Yakima River to keep water in the creek for salmon and steelhead.

Oxford University Press

In southeast Washington, and in southern Russia there are two atomic cities a world apart but with surprising similarities.

Washington River Protection Solutions

A federal contractor says it’s finished pumping out the radioactive waste from one of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation’s single-hulled underground tanks.

Tobin Fricke / Wikimedia - tinyurl.com/h99dl7h

The U.S. Department of Energy faces a $115,000 fine for the way a contractor handled asbestos at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in southeast Washington.

Rajah Bose

In early November, a federal appeals court will consider the case of a well-known Hanford whistleblower.

Hiimniko / Flickr bit.ly/1Q3zXDe

Even though we have had clear skies this week, chances are you can't see the Milky Way at night because the glare from city lights washes out all but the brightest stars where most people live.

Miriam Duerr / Washington Department of Ecology

Washington Governor Jay Inslee has laid out his wish list for how he'd like the state to combat global warming pollution.

U.S. Department of Energy

Washington officials say they’re disappointed but not surprised by news that the federal government likely will miss several more cleanup deadlines at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. 

At Hanford, radioactive sludge stews in aging underground tanks not far from the Columbia River. A 1989 agreement created the timeline for treating that caustic gunk. But the task has proven extremely difficult: A waste treatment plant has been plagued by whistleblowers, critical federal investigations, cost overruns and delays.

Jessica Robinson / Northwest News Network

The U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to begin its new term Monday – despite the federal government shutdown. The new round of legal cases will likely continue a pattern of closely divided rulings.