Crime, Law and Justice

Group Helps Family Dogs Stay Safe And Untethered

Nov 11, 2013
Chris Lehman / Northwest News Network

Oregon canines will be howling an unchained melody starting in January. That's when a new law takes effect that makes it illegal to tie up your dog too long.

Oregon City Police Department

The death of an Oregon police officer this week spotlights a little known element of Northwest law enforcement: volunteer reserve officers who put their lives on the line for little or no pay.

Tom Banse / Northwest News Network

The Washington State Patrol has compiled a full year of data covering drunk driving arrests and crashes since private retailers took over liquor sales in the state.

Douglas County Sheriff's Office

An Oregon appeals court has overturned the escape conviction of an inmate who walked away from a work detail at a county fairground.

Austin Jenkins / Northwest News Network

Just a few blocks away from Washington’s Capitol campus in Olympia you can find a street culture where young adults and teenagers live by their own rules – sometimes with tragic consequences.

Multnomah County Jail

An eco-saboteur charged in a fire-bombing spree that spanned the American West changed her plea in federal court on Thursday.  Rebecca Rubin pled guilty to conspiracy and multiple counts of arson. 

Rubin is now 40 years old. When she was in her twenties, she joined a cell of radical environmentalists loosely affiliated with the Earth Liberation Front and Animal Liberation Front.

Federal investigators blame the shadowy cell for around 20 arsons spanning five Western states. The attacks happened between 1996 and 2001.

A former Democratic operative in Washington has admitted to embezzling campaign money. Michael Walter King pleaded guilty Thursday in King County Superior Court.

Austin Jenkins / Northwest News Network

U.S. guitar makers are under scrutiny these days because of the rare woods they sometimes use. One of those prized woods is found only in the Pacific Northwest.

Cacophony / Wikipedia

The Washington Supreme Court has sided with a wheelchair-bound pot user who lacked an official medical marijuana card. In a split ruling Thursday, the high court said even non-card-holding patients can mount a medical necessity defense at trial.

Tribal casinos take a lot of steps to keep players from cheating. But 42 people in Central Washington are facing charges of conspiracy to cheat on a raffle at a casino run by the Yakama Nation.

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