Crime, Law and Justice

Park Service Investigates What Led Ranger To Shoot Boater

Sep 17, 2013
National Park Service

The National Park Service is investigating what led a park ranger to shoot a man at Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area near Kettle Falls in eastern Washington over the weekend.

Nicholas McVicker

For drug smugglers, getting a truckload of illegal narcotics past border authorities means potentially huge profits.

San Diego Is Biggest Entry Point For Mexican Meth

Sep 13, 2013
Jill Replogle / Fronteras

More than 70 percent of methamphetamine illegally trafficked into the U.S. passes through U.S.-Mexico border crossings in the San Diego area. That’s despite laws in both countries designed to crack down on the drug.

Customs and Border Protection agents at the San Ysidro Port of Entry face a tough balancing act. Facilitating international trade and travel on the one hand. On the other, trying to stop drugs and other illegal cargo from getting into the U.S.

Chris Lehman / Northwest News Network

Drug cartels are doing big business up and down the West Coast. When you go by freeway, you’re driving a Silk Road of sorts for heroin, meth and cocaine.

This export industry is evolving. Drug experts say heroin is back on the rise, fueled in part by prescription drug abuse. And while the supply side of the business may change, the demand remains strong.

"I was in love with it from the very beginning"

Court Exhibit: US v. Anchondo

Mexican drug cartels operate an illicit export business that depends on freeways that run from California and Arizona to Canada. 

Commercial Mobile Alert System. An example of an AMBER Alert sent to a smart phone.

The recent case of two missing children from Washington has raised fresh questions about the Amber Alert system. The brother and sister from Pierce County were located and are safe, but their disappearance did not trigger an Amber Alert.

The siblings were allegedly taken by their mother who has supervised visitation rights, but not custody. Family members reported the mother might be suicidal. Police considered the children endangered and in the past might have issued an Amber Alert that would have flashed across TV screens, radios, cell phones and highway billboards.

Spokane Honors Slain Veteran At Memorial Service

Aug 29, 2013
Jessica Robinson. Michael Brown, 16, stands with his mom, Kim Brown, at the memorial for Delbert Belton.

More than 300 people turned out Thursday in Spokane for the burial of World War II veteran Delbert Belton. The 88-year-old was robbed and beaten to death last week while he waited in his car.

Scores of veterans turned out to honor Belton at a cemetery in west Spokane. Friends and family remember a man who loved to repair cars by day and go out dancing at night, and went by the nickname Shorty.

The service also drew many people in Spokane who never knew Belton, but, like Karen Schute, felt compelled to be there.

World War II veteran Delbert Belton was 88 years old. This photo is part of a memorial created for Belton at the Eagles Lodge in Spokane.

Police have arrested the second teenager accused of beating to death an 88-year-old World War II vet in Spokane. The two 16-year-old males have been charged with first degree robbery and first degree murder in case that's attracted national attention.

Delbert Belton was beaten beyond recognition while he waited in his car outside the Eagles Lodge in north Spokane last week. Belton, known as "Shorty" to his friends, served in the Army and had survived injuries in the battle of Okinawa.

FBI. Israel Keyes, suspected of 11 murders, killed himself in December 2012.

The FBI is hoping a more detailed timeline and newly released video will revive a stalled investigation into a serial killer suspected of 11 murders -- four of them in Washington state. Israel Keyes committed suicide last year in an Alaska jail cell before agents could identify all his victims.

Israel Keyes was caught in 2012 after he kidnapped, raped and murdered a barista named Samantha Koenig in Anchorage. The 34-year-old Keyes told investigators he crisscrossed the country, keeping stashes of murder supplies in strategic locations, and killed strangers, often in remote areas.

Chris Lehman / Northwest News Network

If projections are correct, Oregon will need to build fewer prison beds under a new law.

Governor John Kitzhaber signed a wide-ranging public safety bill Thursday. But the measure he approved fell short of what the Democrat proposed.

Kitzhaber had wanted lawmakers to significantly curb the growth of Oregon's inmate population over the next decade. That would have potentially required controversial changes to the state's mandatory minimum sentencing plan for some violent crimes.

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